He died on Saturday. Six years ago, I profiled him for National Review. Before he made his mark as a philanthropist, he was a doctor:

Most of his patients were victims of trauma, which is the leading cause of injury and death among children. “I learned that trauma is no accident,” he says. “The power of culture plays a big part in what happens.” He observed that the role of religion was especially strong. “If people see themselves as loved by God, they are more likely to do things such as buckle their seatbelts.”

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Kirkian

by John J. Miller on May 14, 2015 · 0 comments

in Blog Posts

My friend Brad Birzer’s forthcoming book on Russell Kirk is now listed on Amazon.com. This will be the definitive biography. A few years ago, I wrote an article for Traverse magazine about Kirk. So it’s pretty much the definitive lifestyle-magazine feature about him.

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Propped

May 3, 2015

My op-ed on Michigan’s Proposal 1–a tax hike aimed largely at fixing roads–is in the Wall Street Journal: Behind the deterioration of Michigan’s roads and bridges is a culture of government spending that guzzles tax dollars the way SUVs burn gas.

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Exorcising

May 3, 2015

My latest Bookmonger podcast is with William Peter Blatty, author of Finding Peter, a new book about life after death. He is also the author of The Exorcist, which I wrote about 15 years ago for the Weekly Standard, in the one and only time I’ve had a byline in that magazine.

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Weather Report

May 1, 2015

“You don’t need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows,” sang Bob Dylan–a line that gave a name to a group of domestic terrorists in the 1970s. Bryan Burrough has written what may be the definitive history of the radical underground movement from that time, and we discuss his new book, Days of [...]

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Birther, Pt. 2

April 27, 2015

Here’s the art that ran beside my Wall Street Journal article on “The Birthmark,” by Nathaniel Hawthorne. I rather like it. The artist is Yao Xiao.  

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